Presidential Elections: Support Dr.Meira Kumar

Bihar and Jharkhand governments have no choice but to support Dr.Meira Kumar. As defeat of "Bihar ki Beti" will invariably bring Shame to the Biharis and Jharkhandis (or erstwhile unified Bihar). Do you think that, people of Bihar will leave Nitish Kumar Scott - free, if Dr.Meira Kumar loses ? So, Nitish Kumar has very little option left but to support, Dr.Meira Kumar.

Moreover, if Nitish Kumar wants to fall in the BJP's well calculated electoral TRAP no one can save him in the next election.

Also, I am surprised to see Mr.Navin Pattanayak, so easily chewing the RSS bait. Orissa is a state, where there is large chunk of Tribal Christian voters loyal to the BJD (Biju Janata Dal). I am still to fathom, BJD's sudden electoral gamble of siding with the RSS and the BJP; when Mr.Pattanayak has been maintaining distance from them since some time.

Besides, the election of Dr.Meira Kumar, who is educated, experienced and very sober, might also correct some of the historical mistakes of not making her father, the Prime Minister of India.

Also, I don't think all the Muslim and Christian MPs and MLAs from the TDP and TRS will ever support a RSS backed Candidate, who acted against Dalit Christian and Muslin reservations. Therefore, invariably cross voting will take place, which might give the underdog, Ms.Kumar, a win. Support Dr.Meira Kumar, give a conscience vote and make her the 2nd Female President of India.

All the best to Dr.Meira Kumar.....👍✌



Sunday, January 26, 2014

Editorial: Golden opportunity
Ideally, the finance minister should lower import duties, to 8% perhaps, and test the waters—artificial curbs on imports also ensure policy makers have no real idea of how weak or strong the CAD is.
Jan 25 2014: Though UPA chairperson Sonia Gandhi has asked the commerce minister to look into the various import curbs on gold—this was based on a petition by the gems and jewelry industry—it is not clear this will be done since the finance minister’s view is that it is premature to assume the current account deficit is under control. While the finance minister may wish to hold on to the higher duties and import curbs, it is worth keeping in mind that gold imports have been falling steadily for the last two quarters—from $16.5 billion in the June 2013 quarter to $3.9 billion in the September quarter and $3 billion in the December quarter—precisely because gold prices have been coming off with the US, and global, economic recovery.

In the last 12 months, gold prices have come off 3% while in the previous 12 months from January 2012 to January 2013, prices rose just under 12%. In other words, chances are gold demand is unlikely to pick up in a significant way if the global economy continues to gather strength. Indeed, despite the sharp hike in gold import duties—from R300 per 10 grams before January 2012 to 8% in June 2013—gold imports rose to 338 tonnes in the June 2013 quarter precisely because global growth looked uncertain, as did the likely impact of the US taper. 

With both looking distinctly better, imports plunged in the September and December quarter. Also, if the CAD is likely to be under $50 billion, the economy is in a position to be able to absorb a hike in gold imports should this take place. Indeed, the bigger danger to the CAD, when Indian growth begins to pick up, is from increased imports of both coal and steel scrap, necessitating action on opening up coal mining to the private sector as well as moving the courts to lift various bans on iron ore mining.

This is will get reflected in lower NRI remittances—either way, the impact on the balance of payments and the rupee will be the same. Ideally, the finance minister should lower import duties, to 8% perhaps, and test the waters—artificial curbs on imports also ensure policy makers have no real idea of how weak or strong the CAD is.

Courtesy: The Financial Express