Presidential Elections: Support Dr.Meira Kumar

Bihar and Jharkhand governments have no choice but to support Dr.Meira Kumar. As defeat of "Bihar ki Beti" will invariably bring Shame to the Biharis and Jharkhandis (or erstwhile unified Bihar). Do you think that, people of Bihar will leave Nitish Kumar Scott - free, if Dr.Meira Kumar loses ? So, Nitish Kumar has very little option left but to support, Dr.Meira Kumar.

Moreover, if Nitish Kumar wants to fall in the BJP's well calculated electoral TRAP no one can save him in the next election.

Also, I am surprised to see Mr.Navin Pattanayak, so easily chewing the RSS bait. Orissa is a state, where there is large chunk of Tribal Christian voters loyal to the BJD (Biju Janata Dal). I am still to fathom, BJD's sudden electoral gamble of siding with the RSS and the BJP; when Mr.Pattanayak has been maintaining distance from them since some time.

Besides, the election of Dr.Meira Kumar, who is educated, experienced and very sober, might also correct some of the historical mistakes of not making her father, the Prime Minister of India.

Also, I don't think all the Muslim and Christian MPs and MLAs from the TDP and TRS will ever support a RSS backed Candidate, who acted against Dalit Christian and Muslin reservations. Therefore, invariably cross voting will take place, which might give the underdog, Ms.Kumar, a win. Support Dr.Meira Kumar, give a conscience vote and make her the 2nd Female President of India.

All the best to Dr.Meira Kumar.....👍✌



Friday, March 29, 2013

Cyprus Will Not Leave The Euro: President Nicos Anastasiades
Newly elected president of Cyprus Nicos Anastasiades waves to supporters. Photograph: Yorgos Karahalis/Reuters
NICOSIA: Cyprus has "contained" the risk of bankruptcy in the wake of a tough rescue package with the European Union and has no intention of leaving Europe's single currency, the island's president said on Friday.

Conservative leader Nicos Anastasiades assured Cypriots and wealthy foreign depositors that restrictions on bank transactions, imposed this week, would gradually be lifted, but gave no time frame.

He hit out at banking authorities in Cyprus and Europe for pouring money into a crippled Cypriot bank that now faces closure under the terms of a 10 billion euro ($13 billion) bailout plan that averted the immediate risk of financial meltdown.

"How serious were those authorities that permitted the financing of a bankrupt bank to the highest possible amount?" Anastasiades said during a speech to civil servants in the capital, Nicosia.

"I don't want to say more," he added. "Now is not the time to say who bears more or less of the blame."

Anastasiades clinched the last-ditch bailout in Brussels five days ago, but has faced a backlash from Cypriots angry at the price that came with it - the winding down of the island's second-largest bank, Cyprus Popular Bank or Laiki, and a raid on deposits over 100,000 euros that could spell the end of Cyprus as a hub for offshore finance.

The country faces steep job losses and a prolonged and deep recession.

"EXPERIMENT"
The president, barely a month in the job and wrestling with Cyprus's worst crisis since a 1974 war split the island in two, accused the 17-nation euro currency bloc of making "unprecedented demands that forced Cyprus to become an experiment".

But he added: "We have no intention of leaving the euro. In no way will we experiment with the future of our country."

He said the immediate danger of national bankruptcy had been averted, and that, "The situation, despite the tragedy of it all, is contained."

Warnings of a stampede at banks when they reopened on Thursday proved unfounded.


For almost two weeks, Cypriots were on a ration of limited withdrawals from bank cash machines. Even with banks now open, they face a regime of strict restrictions designed to halt a flight of capital from the island.

The move is unprecedented since euro coins and banknotes came into circulation in 2002, and flies in the face of the bloc's founding principle of the free movement of money and goods.

Cyprus's difficulties have sent jitters around the fragile single European currency zone.

The imposition of capital controls has led economists to warn that a second-class "Cyprus euro" could emerge, with funds trapped on the island worth less than euros that can be freely spent abroad.

"The temporary restrictive measures adopted concerning economic transactions will be gradually eased until we can return to normal," Anastasiades said.

Under a government decree, the capital controls are intended to last for seven days.

Foreign Minister Ioannis Kasoulides said on Thursday they could last "about a month", but economists warn it could be years before confidence in the Cypriot economy bounces back enough to lift the restrictions.